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Lunch Meat Diet

My wife recently gifted me with a five-pound bar of chocolate. I expressed my appreciation by enthusiastically consuming it at a frightening rate.

Because, you know, who needs willpower right? Well, I’m here to tell you, it’s all giggles and teasing and fun and games until your pants don’t fit. Just as I was about to throw in the wardrobe, I stumbled upon a fantastic solution. So fantastic, that I’ve dropped 3 pounds this week and managed to avoid all junk food snacking for days. What’s my secret?

Meat.

I’ve written before about how the kosher laws around eating meat – and the time to wait after eating meat before you can eat dairy again – have been a subject of much discussion here at GoingKosher Headquarters. In fact, a great deal of planning goes into what we’re going to eat and when we’re going to eat it, just to avoid chewing ourselves into a corner from whence no ice cream can be scooped.

Why all the planning? For those who are coming to this late, here’s the basic facts about keeping kosher with regard to meat and milk:

  1. You can’t eat something that has meat in it together with something that has milk in it
  2. You can’t have them on the same plate
  3. You have to wait between eating one type of meal and another
  4. from milk to meat, you have to wait a short time (some say seconds, others say 20 minutes)
  5. from meat to milk, you have to wait some number of hours. In our case, we wait. Six. Long. Hours.

Normally, we simple eat meat meals – like turkey sandwiches – on Thursdays, when the boys get a meat meal at school, and after school have to bounce off the bus, across the dinner table, and off to cub scouts in short order. Halfway into my sandwich I realized that no milk chocolate bars would be in my immediate future. And by “immediate” I mean that whole six hours thing. I’d have to stay up well past my bedtime just for a snack I didn’t need. Problem solved. At least on those few days we eat meat for dinner.

Through a series of weird events, we’ve been having meat meals at odd times during the week (and day). That six-hour timer kicked in and like magic, half of the contents of our fridge and pantry became off limits to the wild roaming snack-a-beast dwelling in my mind.

“Off limits?” you may be asking. “Like no cheating? Isn’t snacking the epitome of cheating in the first place? What makes this (ie: being fleishig) so much more adhear-able than being on a diet in the first place?”

God.

God didn’t tell me to diet.

(side note: Most of the commandments point to a full enjoyment of each holiday (including Shabbat). This does not jibe well with a desire to say “Oh, I’m going to skip dessert or I’ll regret it later.” Not that “enjoyment” is the same as “eat yourself into a food coma”. But many interpretations are that you should eat more than you normally do during the week. Which was probably great back in the days when people had one or maybe two meals a day and those were pretty sparse. But in America, in these days of plenty, obesity lies just one more “Oneg Shabbat” away if you don’t have some kind of discipline.)

Getting back to God. God didn’t tell me to diet so I treat dieting like most of the other rules in my life – guidelines meant to be bent as the situation dictates.

But Kashrut is a different story. Kashrut came from The Source of All Things. Kashrut is a mitzvah – an obligatory commandment that, if you buy into the whole “God is real and is all-powerful and really does care what I do” scenario, is part of the deal. So yes, I cheat on my diet and no, I don’t cheat on kashrut. You don’t have to agree with it, but it works for me.

While it would make a lousy commercial (and I’m not – yet – svelte enough to be on the short list of spokesmodels anyway), I’m here to tell you that whenever I get those sudden cravings for junk, I just pop a slice of (kosher, of course) bologna in my mouth and that craving just fades away.

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About EdibleTorah

The EdibleTorah is dedicated to building vibrant Jewish communities by helping people set up their own Potluck Shabbat experience with family and friends.

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